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20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN2 7
CSPAN 3
MSNBCW 3
MSNBC 2
WTTG 2
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
WJLA 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WRC 1
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
. for those of you who think burning crosses and hooded rallies are relative of the civil rights era, think again. hate groups in america have doubled in the past decade and it may surprise you who is among their ranks and what their agenda is. inside the new kkk. >> forward, march. >> reporter: in a forest grove not far from the nation's capital -- >> for god. >> for god. >> for country. >> for country. >> reporter: a group of men and women gather. >> for race. >> for race. >> for klan. >> for klan. >> reporter: and the lights fade, they enact a ritual over a century old, but is fresh and searing as the flame they ignite. >> klansmen, the fiery cross. >> reporter: a cross on fire. they. >> reporter: known as the invisible empire for a reason. they thrive in secrecy, almost never permitting outsiders access. who are they? >> i could be your neighborhood. you don't know who i am. you could think the world of me, but yet if you see me in this hood, your thoughts could change. >> i been a fireman. i've been in the navy. >> reporter:people wearing these robes walk among us. >> if you want to be
the government has certain basic responsibilities like guaranteeing civil rights. searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. choosing dialogue over blame, respect over division, hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity but his son, envision. he saw connections others didn't see what the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term he gave his search -- first speech on vietnam. in 1970 he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984 he urged our american leadership to understand the complexity that challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that doesn't mean his campaign
, not disclosing that information when they get to the polls. >> joe, poll watching is done by all party, civil rights groups you and i have been affiliated with. there's nothing wrong with it. why would someone want to purposely deceive their connection or affiliation with poll watching unless there's something they're going to do -- we're dealing with here that does not meet the eye? >> they might get one of those samuel l. jackson attitudes, you know, get out of my face mentality. first of all, that's understand what this is -- who they're directing this at. they will -- it will slow down, for example, the process. now, if you slow down the process -- look how long the lines are been for voting early. imagine what the lines will look like on election day. you slow down the process by having all of these challenges. number two, the elderly are targeted because they lie and they say that a poll worker can't come out and help an elderly who might be in a car or van who has a wheelchair. that's a lie. it slows down those who think they might be discouraged, because i have a record even though i'
push. and they have been out there at the polls. the other thing is those civil rights groups and those groups dedicated to fighting voter suppression have been really campaigning to get people to the polls early and take advantage of early voting. especially in those states where those voter i.d. laws could be a sticking point. they want to give those people a chance in case there is a snag, a hiccup, they can still have time to get to the polls november 6th. >> and in case they don't know, 6 and 7, we're talking about same-sex marriage and we're talking about expanding gambling in prince george's county. >> yeah, two big, big contentious issues. two issues that both sides, the fors and against, have spent a ton of money, a ton of money, record-setting amounts of money, manpower, and so on. and so these issues really are driving people. people want to take their time in the booths. and so that's contributing to the long line as well as just the turnout. >> a lot to get through on those ballots. how about the district? what's going on in d.c.? because we're seeing long lines here too. >
's about protecting the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> this is fox 5 news at 10:00. >>> d.c. mayor vincent gray is announcing big changes to speed camera fines which many drivers feel are excessive. here's the breakdown of the proposed changes. if you're going 10 miles over, the final drop from 75 to 50 bucks, 11 to 15 miles over the limit, fines will drop from 125 bucks to 100 bucks. if you're caught driving 25 miles per hour over the speed limit, the fine goes up 250 to $300. this change comes as city council considers a plan that would slash fines even more. fox 5's matt ackland has this story. >> with a council committee ready to take on those high speed camera fines next monday, mayor gray unveiled his own plan. >> we continue to work on this up through including yesterday and we are ready to announce the direction that we are going to be pursuing. >> under a plan proposed by council members mary cheh and tommy wells basically all speed camera fines would be lowered to 50 buck
, notably some of the nominations to the supreme court, and the soft attitude on civil rights to woo southern support." "the des moines register" endorsed nixon after, after the watergate burglary which occurred on june 17th of that election year. in june of the election year, the democratic party headquarters in washington was broken into in the middle of the night and instantly the entire world suspected richard nixon. in september of the election year, seven co-conspirators were indicted in the burglary including two men with strong ties to republican world. watergate got one line. one line in "the des moines register's" presidential endorsement in 1972. "we are disturbed by the watergate scandal and the evidence linking it with the white house." they were disturbed but not disturbed enough not to endorse richard milhous nixon. there wasn't a kid in my high school who didn't know that tricky dick was a crook, but "the des moines register" editorial board didn't know that. >> i'm not a crook. >> 19 days before "the des moines register" endorsed that crook, bob woodward and carl ber
the civil right to make a lifelong commitment to the person you love. join me in supporting question 6. it's the right thing to do. >>> straight ahead at 8:00, surviving sandy, the east coast shuts down as the deadly superstorm moves closer from school closings to storm surges, we have you covered with live team coverage all morning long. good morning everybody, i'm tony perkins. >> i'm allison seymour. right now, the storm is making its way up the east coast, poised for a district hit on the mid-atlantic tonight. >> in preparation of that, states of emergency have been declared from virginia to massachusetts, and president obama has promised a quick federal response. experts say sandy could impact some 50 million people up and down the east coast. it is already blamed for the deaths of 65 after sweeping through the caribbeans. >> now here at home, officials aren't taking any chances. >> that's because most schools in the region are closed, so is the federal government and the dc city government. you can see the full list of delays scrolling at the top of your screen and online at myfoxdc.
that government has certain basic responsibilities by guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame respect over division hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and his integrity but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see. like the connection between little civility and hungry children. that vision became good for peace and a mcgovern dole international food education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962 he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on vietnam. in 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels and in 1984 he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, the challenges and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america will be a better place had george become
for themselves and what straight couples have right now. host: so why not civil unions? >> it's a very different institution, it is a second class institution. civil unions are ok in some states. they were definitely part of the journey towards marriage. i have a great deal of respect for the states that passed those. but unfortunately the word marriage is the only word that is recognized in federal law approximately 1300 times. so when it comes down to protecting our families it is really only the institution of marriage the right to marry that will give us those protections. i will tell you we are on a journey here as americans continuously on a number of different issues. so we have to understand that we are looking to be treated as equal in the eyes of the law and equal in terms of the common human bonds that we share with all americans. and it is really only marriage that gets you that equal standing with my straight brother and sister. host: so what protections would be different under a marriage than civil unions? >> right now the federal government has a law in place called the defensive
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
because they've been right at "the new york times" jobs to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. that got me thinking, whose job is at? if it's not going to be the times they are going to shut up private plans, at least sort of a vacuum. i would've thought responsible government would leave that felt by the government as opposed to by law professors and centers for national security. so as i said at the beginning, i do agree with john at the debate is not in any significant regard difference in so far as the tensions from what has been really for the better part of the last seven years. i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability and at least uncomfortable with. and maybe that's just because i'm a law professor who happens to spend time in the trenches like these guys. >> i think it's a little uncomfortable to talk about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has been occurred. the question has been life to the ngos, the think tanks, the press committees are to figure out who exactly is responsib
protect you and me from those who would do us harm, threaten our rights and take away our civil liberties whether they be foreign or domestic, unscrupulous businesses, corporations or individuals. i gained a reputation as a legislator committed to working together. i worked with governor mike leavitt to balance the state budget every single year. collaboration is how problems are solved. as your united states senator, i promise you every day i'll work the represent you -- to represent you and this great state. god bless you. god bless utah, and thank you very much. >> moderator: on behalf of the studio audience, our viewing audience and the citizens of utah, we thank you both for running. [applause] >> that debate between candidates to represent utah in the u.s. senate happened on october 17th. it's one of the dozens of debates we've been bringing you this election season. follow campaign 2012 live on the c-span television networks, c-span radio and c-span.org. you can also find us on twitter and facebook, and we've also been taking a look at some of the swing states in play this election
wrote, it's not "the new york times"' job to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. and that got me thinking, well, then whose job is it? you know, if it's not going to be the times, and if you're going to shut out private plaintiffs from pursuing this information, i don't know, you know, that leaves a sort of a vacuum. and i would have thought that responsible government would believe that the vacuum should be filled by the government, right? as opposed to by law professors and, you know, senators or national security. i do, as i said in the beginning, i do agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different, um, insofar as the tensions, um, from what it's been really for the better part of the post-world war -- the better part of the last 70 years. but i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability than at least i'm comfortable with, um, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, law professor who hasn't spent time in the trenches like these guys. >> you know, i think it's a little uncomfortable to
urges revenge against mitt romney. what happened to civility? we'll be right back. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >> gretchen: welcome back everyone. the presidential election just three days away now. can you imagine that both candidates are going from town to town to town to town in those swing states. what are they saying? remember when president obama talked a lot about civility and how we should all be nice to each other and not really say any words that might be negative. >> steve: how is that working out? >> gretchen: yesterday he used a word that was new to his stump speech. he got boos from the audience when he talked about mitt romney but then he said this. >> at the time the republic congress any senate candidate by the name of mitt rom? i. [boos] >> no, no, no. don't
hope you are right. thank you, sir for joining us live on this saturday morning. >> thanks for having me. >> brian: four minutes until the bottom of the hour. so much for civility on the campaign trail eastward either side. revenge on mitt romney? what revenge? i thought this was their first match. >> steve: she tried to sneak a fast ones at the polls but wound up walking out in handcuffs. what did she do? we got details. >> brian: that hair color looks so natural. ♪ there she goes again. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to turn for your legal matters. maybe you want to incorporate a business you'd like to start. or protect your family with a will or living trust. legalzoom makes it easy withtep-by-step help when completing your personalized document -- or you can even access an attorney to guide you along. with an "a" rating fr
in investigating. it's not the "new york times'" job to do the work of human rights and civil liberty groups. that got me thinking. well, then, whose job is it? if it's not the times', and you shut out plaintiffs in the information; that leaves a vacuum, and i thought the responsible thing would be to fill it by the government opposed to law professors and centers for national security. as i said in the beginning, i agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different in as far as the tensions what's been really for the better part of the better part of the last 70 years, but i think that we are leaning more towards a lack of public accountability than i'm comfortable with, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, a law professor not in the trenches like these guys. >> it's uncomfortable to talking about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has not occurred, and the question has been left to the ngos, the think tanks, the press to sort of figure out, well, who exactly is responsible for braining that accou
and-3.4% decrease in jobs in on right to work states and it is 6% differential and right to work is part of that. dennis: that is a wrap but it was a nice and civil debate. thank you very much. good day to you, gentlemen. election day approaching fast. we will be debating the issues that matter until november 6th. two more to go. tomorrow we will debate this with jobs, with dan, chief economist and christian dorsey of the economic policy institute. cheryl: time for your west coast minute as hurricane sandy it so did apple ceo tim cook announcing a major management change with apple shares below $600. the company is dealing with negative reviews of its ipad mini. getting criticized for bad display quality and high price. also in silicon valley netflix getting a taste of hurricane carl icahn. the activist investor gained a 10% stake in the company. the question is why? some speculate he may want to see netflix acquired by one of the bigger tech names like microsoft or amazon. stock was up 14% yesterday. today it is down by a fraction. shares of las vegas's boy gaming plunging. stoc
, nothing to do with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the only president between lincoln and johnson who took civil rights for african-americans at all seriously, and after grant left office, the african-american -- the former slaves were simply left to the tender mercies of the white majorities of the south, and quickly, they were shoved to the side of politics. >> okay. don't ask a question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. [laughter] >> i accept yes, no, and multiple choice questions. [laughter] >> we have just three minutes left, and it's a serious deadline. you have to ask a brief question and see what answer we can get out of bill. >> i hope so. you said once youmented to write american history through biography. when i read the binge min frankly biographers, he was the prototypical american, modern in some sense. who -- having once been to england, i saw different people, even though they speak english. who was the first american in the sense that he has or she has attitudes like we do on any plans of writing a b
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)